Hiltz calls on Canterbury to say "no" to the ACNA

 

Hiltz calls on Canterbury to say "no" to the ACNA

Author: 

George Conger

The leader of the Anglican Church of Canada has lobbied the Archbishop of Canterbury-designate not to extend formal recognition to the Anglican Church in North America. However, the decision who is an Anglican does not rest with the Archbishop of Canterbury.  The communion’s formal statement as to who is an Anglican looks to fellowship with the Archbishop of Canterbury and fidelity to the doctrines and disciplines set forth in the Book of Common Prayer.
The 6 Dec 2012 meeting at Auckland Castle, Durham with Bishop Justin Welby was one of four stops for Archbishop Fred Hiltz, who also met with the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Rowan Williams at Lambeth Palace and with the general secretary of the Anglican Consultative Council, Canon Kenneth Kearon, in London, and preached at Southwark Cathedral.
According to the Anglican Journal, Archbishop Hiltz said he mentioned his ongoing concern about efforts by the ACNA to be recognized by the Church of England. Archbishop Hiltz said he requested that if bodies of the Church of England are to meet with representatives of ACNA, “in fairness, they should also meet with us to get a better picture.”
Bishop Welby was “very appreciative” of the place of the Anglican Church of Canada in the Communion and the contributions it has been able to make, Archbishop Hiltz reported.
In its legal battle with breakaway congregations in the Diocese of New Westminster, the Anglican Church of Canada argued that it was the sole legitimate expression of Anglicanism in Canada and cited as proof of this contention statements made by Dr. Rowan Williams that the Anglican Church of Canada was a member of the Anglican Consultative Council. Were the General Synod of the Church of England to give formal recognition to the ACNA, it could well undercut the claims of exclusivity made by Archbishop Hiltz to the Anglican brand in Canada.
However, membership in the Anglican Consultative Council is a partial mark of membership in the Anglican Communion.  Several provinces are listed as members of the Anglican Communion on the website maintained by the ACC’s London office who do not appear on the schedule of membership of the ACC: Spain, Portugal, Bermuda, Cuba and the Falkland Islands.  The Church of Ceylon, whilst appearing on the ACC membership schedule, does not send its leader to the Primates Meeting.
Nor is membership of the Anglican Communion determined by invitations to the Lambeth Conferences. The Bishops of New Hampshire, Harare and Manicaland were explicitly excluded from the 2008 Lambeth Conference, although those dioceses are listed on the schedule kept by the ACC, while the bishops of the Anglican Mission in America and the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (whose jurisdictions were recognized by some, but not all of the provinces of the Anglican Communion) were also excluded.
The definition of the Anglican Communion set forth in the 1930 Lambeth Conference and cited in the preamble to the constitution of the Episcopal Church of the USA states:
The Anglican Communion is a fellowship, within the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church, of those duly constituted dioceses, provinces or regional Churches in communion with the See of Canterbury, which have the following characteristics in common:
a.       they uphold and propagate the Catholic and Apostolic faith and order as they are generally set forth in the Book of Common Prayer as authorised in their several Churches;
b.      they are particular [dioceses] or national Churches, and, as such, promote within each of their territories a national expression of Christian faith, life and worship; and
c.       they are bound together not by a central legislative and executive authority, but by mutual loyalty sustained through the common counsel of the bishops in conference.
 Archbishop Hiltz reported that he has accepted an invitation to attend the installation of Bishop Welby as Archbishop of Canterbury 21 March 2013.